Teague = Tadhg, Proper Names

Ancient Irish Proper Names

Tadhg (modernized Teige) originally meant “a poet;” it is the root of the sirnames Teague, MacTague, Tighe, Montague, etc.

Teague (English) = Theigue (Irish) = Tadhg (Celtic)

Celtic Surnames

So much for our surnames. If havoc has been played with them in the course of a century or two, still greater havoc has been made with our Christian names. Mr. Laurence Ginnell, in his interesting article in a late number of the New Ireland Review, has pointed out that the Highlanders have preserved their Celtic Christian names much better than we have preserved ours. Even when their surnames may have changed, still we find such markedly Gaelic Christian names as Angus and Malcolm and Duncan and Murdoch and Kenneth and Donald quite popular amongst them, and sometimes even in Lowland families. Of thousands of Celtic Christian names current amongst us, so late even as a couple of centuries ago, scarce half a hundred survive: among the most usual being Brian, Colman, Donagh (Ir. Donnchadh, Scottish ‘Duncan’) Felim, Fergus, Finnian (Ir. Finnghin), Fintan, Kieran (Ciarán), Kevin (Ir. Caoimhghin) Jarlath (for Iarfhlaith), Mogue (Maodhóg), Murtagh (Muircheartach), Neill (for Niall), Owen (Eoghan), and Theigue (for Tadhg). And most of these are very rare. No doubt a great many more are used in Irish, but they are generally Englished by some travesty, as when Diarmuid (‘Dermod,’ ‘Dermot’) is rendered by ‘Jeremiah,’ or ‘Darby,’ Domhnall (‘Donald’) by `Daniel,’ Conchubhar (‘ Conor ‘) by ‘Cornelius,’ Cathal (‘Cahal’) by ‘Charles,’ Flaithri by ‘Florence,’ Maol-Mhuire by ‘Miles’, ‘Myles,’ &c.

Garrett, Howell – Celtic/Irish Origins

Celtic Surnames

Many Norman families assumed the Mac having given up the style and title of Norman barons and adopted those of Irish chiefs. Hence we have MacWilliam, MacHenry, MacWalter–which in the Isle of Man became shortened to Qualter and Qualters–MacFheorais, shortened to ‘Corish’ and ‘Coriss’ from Feoras, a weakened form of Peoras or Piaras, i.e., Piers or Pierce, in modern French Pierre; MacRicard and Crickard, which latter may be compared with the Welsh-Norman Prichard. The Norman Fitz became Mac in Irish; hence Fitzgerald became MacGearailt, while from Gerauld or Geraud came the Christian name Gearóid, sometimes anglicised ‘Garrett’; Fitzgibbon became MacGiobúin, Fitzmaurice MacMuiris, &c. Of names originally Welsh, MacHale (for Mac Heil, i.e., MacHoel from Howell or Hywell), and MacArthur are instances, but there are others not so well known. No purely English names appear to have taken the Mac–any that may seem to be English, being really Danish or Norman.

Celtic/Jewish Origins of surnames

Celtic Surnames

But as for the Mac, it is found joined to all sorts of foreign names, almost as easily, but, of course, not near so plentifully as to Celtic names.–Hebrew, Greek, Latin, Danish, Norman, and Welsh. To Hebrew names as in MacThomas, MacComas (the Th being lost), MacParlan, MacFarlane (for MacPartholáin, i.e., MacBartholom-aeus.) Very strange is the junction of the western mac with some decidedly eastern names, as in MacDavid (also MacDavitt, MacDevitt, and MacDaid), MacSimon (anglicised Fitzsimons, Simmons, and Simson). Even MacIsaac is found in Scotland and in the Isle of Man, in which latter place it is sometimes shortened and corrupted into ‘Kissack’; and, of course, we are all familiar with the Highland MacAdam. It is found with Greek names in MacAndrew (for MacAindreis), MacNicholas (MacNioclais), MacNicholl (MacNiocoil), MacGregor (MacGriogora), and others. With Latin names, as in MacManus (for MacMaghnusa from Magnus), MacConsidine, and Considine without the Mac (from Constantin-us), MacRealey, Magrealey, and Grealey (for MacRiaghla, from Riaghal, i.e., Regulus), and several others. These Latin, Greek, and Hebrew names–many of them Biblical–might have been borne either by Celts or foreigners; but as most of them go back to the first ages of Christianity in Ireland, they generally denote families of Celtic origin. Many families of Danish origin show this by their name, as the MacAuliffes (from MacAmhlaoibh, i.e., son of Amlaf or Aulaf), the MacHammonds and MacCammonds (from MacAmaind), the MacOtters and ‘Cotters (MacOtair) and others; yet, it must not be forgotten that after a while Amhlaoibh, Amand, Otar, &c, came to be used also by Celtic families, and therefore in some cases the only thing Danish about such people would be their names.

Celtic Origins of Certain Surnames

Celtic Surnames

Celtic Surnames

“For the Tongue of the Gael” by Tomas O Flannghaile, 1896

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Welsh family names are generally easy to recognise, but in many cases they have suffered assimilation to English forms and are often ignorantly mistaken for English names. Such names as Tudor, Gwynn (Wynn) Morgan, Meredith, Owen, Griffith, Rhys (Rees, Rice) Lloyd, Howell, Evan, Vaughan, and Craddock–even in the English spelling which most of them have assumed–are of course unmistakable, but now they are found in all parts of England. The last mentioned–Craddock–if not one of the most distinguished, is certainly one of the most ancient of them, for it is but the English spelling of Caradoc (accent on the second syllable) a later form of Caratauc which represents Caratacus (corruptly ‘Caractacus’) the name of the British warrior who fought so valiantly against the Romans. The Irish had the same name Cárthach whence MacCarthaigh or ‘McCarthy’; hence Welsh ‘Craddock’ equals Irish ‘Carthy.’ At the beginning of the Christian era the Irish form was most probably *Carathachas.

Then we find these and other names with the sign of the English genitive added on, as Owens, Griffiths, Evans, Maddox (i.e., Maddocks from Madoc), &c. Those also are numerous that contain a trace of the Ap found in Welsh mediaeval names and genealogies, representing the older map (now mab), a son; as Preece, Pryce, Price (for Ap Rhys, i.e., Map Rhys, son of Rhys), Powell and Pole (Ap Hoel Ap Hywel), Pugh (for Ap Hugh); and such Norman-Welshnames as Prichard (ApRichard), Probert (Ap Robert), Probyn (Ap Robin) Penry (Ap Henry) Parry, (Ap Harry). Some show a trace of the weakened form. Ab (for mab), as Bowen (Ab Owen–though of course all the Bowens are not Welsh) Bevan (Ab Evan) Bethell, (Ab Ithell), &c. Then come the later and far more numerous sort consisting mostly of Biblical, Norman, or Saxon names generally with the English genitive s added on, as Davis (Davies) Daniels, Peters, Jones (John’s) Williams, Roberts, Edwards, Hughes, &c., &c. But though these non-Celtic names generally denote Celtic families, they do not necessarily indicate a Welsh orign, and many of them are pure English.

William of Normandy, William the Conqueror

StateMaster – Encyclopedia: William the Conqueror

William the Conqueror
A romantic nineteenth century artists impression of King William I of England
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A romantic nineteenth century artists impression of King William I of England
British Royalty
House of Normandy

William I
Children
Robert Curthose
William Rufus
Adela of Blois
Henry Beauclerc
William II
Henry I
Children
Empress Maud
William Adelin
Robert, 1st Earl of Gloucester
Stephen

William I (c. 1027 – September 9, 1087), was King of England from 1066 to 1087. Known alternatively as William of Normandy, William the Conqueror and William the Bastard, he was the illegitimate and only son of Robert the Magnificent, Duke of Normandy, and Herleva, the daughter of a tanner. Born in Falaise, Normandy, now in France, William succeeded to the throne of England by right of conquest by winning the Battle of Hastings in 1066 in what has become known as the Norman Conquest. From [1], in the public domain This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. … From [1], in the public domain This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. … The Normans (adapted from the name Northmen or Norsemen) were a mixture of the indigenous Gauls of France and of the Viking invaders under the leadership of Rollo (Gange Rolf). … This image depicts a seal, an emblem, a coat of arms or a crest. … Robert (called Curthose for his short squat appearance) (c. … William II (called Rufus, perhaps because of his red-faced appearance, or maybe his bloody reign) (c. … Adela of Blois (c. … Henry I (c. … William II (called Rufus, perhaps because of his red-faced appearance, or maybe his bloody reign) (c. … Henry I (c. … Empress Maud (1102 – September 10, 1167) is the title by which Matilda, daughter and dispossessed heir of King Henry I of England and his wife Maud of Scotland (herself daughter of Malcolm III Canmore and St. … William Adelin (1103 – November 25, 1120) was the only legitimate son of Henry I of England and his wife Maud of Scotland. … Robert of Gloucester also frequently refers to the historian Robert_of_Gloucester Robert, 1st Earl of Gloucester (~1090 – October 31, 1147) was an illegitimate son of Henry I of England, and one of the dominant figures of the English Anarchy period. … Stephen (1096 – October 25, 1154), the last Norman King of England, reigned from 1135 to 1154, when he was succeeded by his cousin Henry II, the first of the Angevin or Plantagenet Kings. … Events March 26 – Pope John XIX crowns Conrad II Holy Roman Emperor. … September 9 is the 252nd day of the year (253rd in leap years). … Events May 9 – The remains of Saint Nicholas were brought to Bari. … This is a list of British monarchs, that is, the monarchs on the thrones of some of the various kingdoms that have existed on, or incorporated, the island of Great Britain, namely: England (united with Wales from 1536) up to 1707; Scotland up to 1707; The Kingdom of Great Britain… Royal motto: Dieu et mon droit (French: God and my right) Englands location within the UK Official language English de facto Capital London de facto Largest city London Area – Total Ranked 1st UK 130,395 km² Population – Total (2001) – Density Ranked 1st UK 49,138,831 377/km² Religion… Events January 6 – Harold II is crowned King of England the day after Edward the Confessor dies. … Illegitimacy was a term in common usage for the condition of being born of parents who are not validly married to one another; the legal term is bastardy. … Robert I (or Robert the Magnificent) (c. … The Duke of Normandy is a title held (or claimed) by various Norman, English, French and British rulers from the 10th century. … Herleva (or Arlette) was the mother of William the Conqueror. … Falaise is a commune in the Calvados département, in the Basse-Normandie administrative région, in Normandy, north-western France. … Normandy is a geographical region in northern France. … The Battle of Hastings was the decisive Norman victory in the Norman conquest of England in 1066. … Bayeux Tapestry depicting events leading to the Battle of Hastings The Norman Conquest was the conquest of the Kingdom of England by William the Conqueror (Duke of Normandy), in 1066 at the Battle of Hastings and the subsequent Norman control of England. …

Brian Boru – Emperor of the Irish

StateMaster – Encyclopedia: Brian Boru

Brian Boru, Emperor of the Irish
Reign 1002 – 1014
Full name Brian Bóruma mac Cennétig
Predecessor Máel Sechnaill mac Domnaill
Successor Máel Sechnaill mac Domnaill
Father Cennétig mac Lorcáin
Mother Bé Binn ingen Murchada

Brian Bóruma mac Cennétig (926 or 941[1]–23 April 1014) (known as Brian Boru in English) was High King of Ireland from 1002 to 1014. Image File history File links Brian_boru_scaled. … Engraving is the practice of incising a design onto a hard, flat surface, by cutting grooves into it. … Events November 13 – English king Ethelred gives order to kill all Danes in England, leading to the St. … Events February 14 – Pope Benedict VIII recognizes Henry of Bavaria as King of Germany July 29 – Battle of Kleidion: Basil II inflicts not only a decisive defeat on the Bulgarian army, but his subsequent savage treatment of 15,000 prisoners reportedly causes Tsar Samuil of Bulgaria to die of shock… Máel Sechnaill mac Domnaill (died 2 September 1022), sometimes called Máel Sechnaill Mór or Máel Sechnaill II, was king of Mide and High King of Ireland. … Cennétig mac Lorcáin (died 951) was an Irish king. … In Early Irish mythology, Bébinn was a goddess associated with birth and the sister of the river-goddess, Boann. … Events Bohai is conquered by the Khitan Births Emperor Murakami of Japan Deaths Categories: 926 … Events Oda the Severe becomes Archbishop of Canterbury Births Charles dOutremer son of Louis IV of France Deaths Categories: 941 … is the 113th day of the year (114th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. … Events February 14 – Pope Benedict VIII recognizes Henry of Bavaria as King of Germany July 29 – Battle of Kleidion: Basil II inflicts not only a decisive defeat on the Bulgarian army, but his subsequent savage treatment of 15,000 prisoners reportedly causes Tsar Samuil of Bulgaria to die of shock… The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. … This does not cite its references or sources. … Events November 13 – English king Ethelred gives order to kill all Danes in England, leading to the St. … Events February 14 – Pope Benedict VIII recognizes Henry of Bavaria as King of Germany July 29 – Battle of Kleidion: Basil II inflicts not only a decisive defeat on the Bulgarian army, but his subsequent savage treatment of 15,000 prisoners reportedly causes Tsar Samuil of Bulgaria to die of shock…

Although the exact details of his birth are unknown, he was born in the mid tenth century near Killaloe (Kincora) (in modern County Clare). His father was Cennétig mac Lorcáin, King of Thomond and his mother was Bé Binn ingen Murchada, daughter of the King of West Connacht. After his brothers death he became leader of the Dál gCais, and subsequently gained control over Munster. By 1002 the reigning High King of Ireland, Máel Sechnaill mac Domnaill, passed his title to Brian. Boru sought to make good the title of High King in a way that previous holders had not; to make himself the actual ruler of Ireland rather than in name only. By 1011 all of the regional rulers of Ireland recognised him as their superior, this however was short lived. The following year the King of the province of Leinster with the support of the Norse king of Dublin and Viking mercenaries rebelled against Brian’s authority and, although the rebel forces were decisively defeated in 1014 at the Battle of Clontarf, Boru was killed along with most of the leaders of the province of Munster.