William Speer – Revolutionary War

CHAPTER 3

CHAPTER 3

WILLIAM SPEER, SR.

IN THE

REVOLUTIONARY WAR

Imagine yourself, if you can, recently immigrated to a new county and almost immediately becoming embroiled in a bitter revolution against the most powerful nation on earth! Young William Speer1 found himself in just such a situation when, at the age of 25, he left his home in Northern Ireland and immigrated to America. He arrived on the third of September 1772, surely full of enthusiasm and eager to begin his new life. He lived in Pennsylvania for a few years, perhaps with relatives or friends, and moved to Charleston, South Carolina in 1774 just as the American Revolution was beginning. Due to the war, it would be nine more years before William would settle down, get married and begin a family. This chapter attempts to relate what we know about his Revolutionary War service with the political and military history of South CarolinaA. See CHAPTER 2 for the family history of William Speer.

William Speer – Revolutionary War

CHAPTER 3

CHAPTER 3

WILLIAM SPEER, SR.

IN THE

REVOLUTIONARY WAR

Imagine yourself, if you can, recently immigrated to a new county and almost immediately becoming embroiled in a bitter revolution against the most powerful nation on earth! Young William Speer1 found himself in just such a situation when, at the age of 25, he left his home in Northern Ireland and immigrated to America. He arrived on the third of September 1772, surely full of enthusiasm and eager to begin his new life. He lived in Pennsylvania for a few years, perhaps with relatives or friends, and moved to Charleston, South Carolina in 1774 just as the American Revolution was beginning. Due to the war, it would be nine more years before William would settle down, get married and begin a family. This chapter attempts to relate what we know about his Revolutionary War service with the political and military history of South CarolinaA. See CHAPTER 2 for the family history of William Speer.

Speer/Spear men – during Civil War

37th Alabama Regiment of Volunteer Infantry CSA | Slaton – Stalvy

Spear, Thomas
Private
Company C
POW at Missionary Ridge TN on 25 Nov 1863 and sent to Nashville TN, Louisville KY and on to Rock Island Prison IL

Spears, Archibald C (“Arch”)
Rank Unknown (presumed to be a Private as he is also listed as “Musician”)
Company F
Enlisted 10 Aug 1861 (record predated formation of 37th AL CSA); Listed as “Musician”; Paroled at Greensboro NC 1 May 1865 as part of CONSOLIDATED 37th AL CSA Company F

Spears, Henry W
Private
Company A
Age at Enlistment: 32
Enlisted 5 May 1862 at Abbeville AL by A.C. Gorden; Listed as Private on Muster Roll of Company A dated 13 May 1862 at Auburn AL; Served as Teamster Sep & Dec 1862 and Jan 1863; WIA or sick as he signed his parole at Vicksburg MS on 13 July 1863 in City Hospital as a Private of Co. A of the 37th AL Infantry CSA, and is listed among sick or wounded aboard steamer H. Chouteau bound for Mobile AL via New Orleans LA; Died in service of unknown cause at unknown place/date; Claim for deceased soldier filed 14 Sep 1864 by R.A. Spears, widow

Spears, L
Private
Company A
Enlisted (Conscripted?) __ Oct 1864; paroled at Greensboro NC 1 May 1865 as part of CONSOLIDATED 37th AL CSA Company A

Speer (Speir), Alfred A
Private
Company I
Enlisted 28 Apr 1862 at Lafayette AL after serving 12 months in 7th AL Infantry Regiment CSA; Appears on Muster Roll of “Company ’I’ 37th Regiment, Alabama Volunteers at LaFayette, Chambers County, Alabama, March 6, 1862” published in 31 July 1901 issue of LAFAYETTE SUN (LaFayette, Chambers County AL) with Privates as “Speer, Alfred A.”; Witnessed the Confederate Pension application of Mrs. B. H. (Lucey) Hammack, widow of Benjamin H. Hammack (Co. I); Relationship unproven, but possibly related in some manner to Joseph Jarrell (Co. I) as his wife’s name known to be Mary Palestine Spiers – see Jarrell’s record

Williams – coat of arms, surname meaning

Family Tree Maker’s Genealogy Site: Photo

This distinguished family name can be traced as far back as the Domesday Book, with a Robert filius Willelmi recorded in 1086; Richard William lived in Oxfordshire in 1279, and a John Wylyam was recorded in the Subsidy Rolls in Sussex in 1296. Legend has it that the family Williams is descended from Brychan Brecheiniog who was Lord of Brecknock at the time of King Arthur. His seat was at Llangibby Castle in Monmouthshire. The ancient family name motto was “Cywir in Gwlad”. Source: The Heritage Collection. No genealogical connection is implied.

Wright – Coat of Arms, surname meaning.

Family Tree Maker’s Genealogy Site: Photo

The name Wright is occupational from the Old English word “wryhta”, meaning “carpenter, joiner, one who wrought”. Early records show a Petere le Writh in Sussex in 1214 and a Robert le Wrichte was recorded in Essex in 1255. The ancient family motto was “Meritez” (French, meaning “Deservedly”). Source: The Heritage Collection. No genealogical connection is implied.

Guion Miller Roll Results

Guion Miller Roll Results

Total Records: 1 Number Surname Given Middle State Comments Page
26119 Spruill Mattie Worley Ga 283
10/4/2009 Page 1 of 1

Tribal Membership Requirements

Native American Indian Tribal Enrollment

What are tribal membership requirements?
Tribal enrollment criteria are set forth in tribal constitutions, articles of incorporation or ordinances. The criterion varies from tribe to tribe, so uniform membership requirements do not exist.

Two common requirements for membership are lineal decendency from someone named on the tribe’s base roll or relationship to a tribal member who descended from someone named on the base roll. (A “base roll” is the original list of members as designated in a tribal constitution or other document specifying enrollment criteria.) Other conditions such as tribal blood quantum, tribal residency, or continued contact with the tribe are common.